Stolen Innocence

Nearly 1 in 5 women in the United States will have experienced rape or attempted rape during their lifetime.

According to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), sexual violence is defined as any type of unwanted sexual contact. This can include words or actions of a sexual nature against a person’s will and without their consent. Consent is a mutual agreement to take part in sexual activity.

Unfortunately, survivors of sexual abuse often know the person who assaulted them. Studies also show that people who sexually abuse usually target someone they know — a friend, classmate, neighbor, coworker, or relative.

In 2005-10, about 55% of rape or sexual assault victimizations occurred at or near the victim’s home, and another 12% occurred at or near the home of a friend, relative, or acquaintance.

Together, we can change the conditions that contribute to sexual violence.

You can learn the facts about sexual violence and play an active role in changing misconceptions. Prevention starts with believing survivors when they disclose. In your personal life, you can model supportive relationships and behaviors and speak up when you hear sexist, racist, or homophobic comments.

If you are unsure of how to speak up, simply saying a statement like “I feel offended by you saying that” or simply expressing your discomfort with a matter would be a good way to start that conversation.

If you or someone you know is a survivor of sexual violence, please contact the following:

Resources:
National Sexual Violence Resource Center
877-739-3895
www.nsvrc.org

Hotlines:
Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN)
800-656-4673
https://rainn.org/get-help                                                                     

The National Domestic Violence Hotline
800-799-7233
http://www.thehotline.org/help

 

 

Stronger Than HIV

 Stigma is a cancer. If we allow it to, it eats at your soul. We can’t allow stigma to take over or overshadow us as individuals. HIV is such a small part of our DNA. We were who we are before we contracted or were born with HIV. It is nothing that is our fault and we can’t let it overshadow our goals. HIV is somethistigmang that moved in, uninvited. We have to be stronger than HIV.

 
I am a mother. I am a grandmother and great-grandmother. No matter how great the obstacles we face, God never puts too much on anyone that can’t handle it. Believe in yourself. Look in the mirror and tell yourself that you love yourself.

Put HIV in its place and love your life. Continue to live your life and be confident with the woman that you are. I was diagnosed 29 years ago and today I stand before you, undetectable.

The Youth Speaks Out!

It’s National Youth HIV/ AIDS Awareness Day!

In this spirit, checkout some encouraging and beautiful phrases that middle school students wrote for individuals living with HIV!

Word Cloud

On this day, we need to recognize the youth and what their needs are! Let’s see how we can work towards providing resources to youth living with HIV!

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National Youth HIV/ AIDS Awareness Day!

Every month 1,000 young people are infected with HIV and over 76,400 young people are currently living with HIV across the United States.

National Youth HIV & AIDS Awareness Day (NYHAAD) is a day to educate the public about the impact of HIV and AIDS on young people as well as highlight the amazing work young people are doing across the country carrying out to fight the HIV & AIDS epidemic.

In the United States, one in four new HIV infections are among youth ages 13 to 24. Young people and supporters are determined to end this epidemic and on April 10th, we hope that you will help acknowledge the great work young people are already doing in the community!

According to NYHAAD, there are 5 simple ways you can help out:
1. Get tested!
2. Tune into a live conversation on the impact of HIV on youth on April 10 at 5:30 PM EST on HUFFINGTON POST LIVE
3. Follow NYHAAD on Facebook and Twitter using @YouthAIDSDay and #NYHAAD
4. Go to the Center for Disease Control website
5. Share NYHAAD’s new infographics on what young people need to get for an “AIDS-free generation”
If we’re not reaching out to these young people, an AIDS-Free Generation will be almost impossible to achieve. If you are interested in doing more to help helping out, commemorating, and/ or learning more about NYHAAD, please visit: amplifyyourvoice.org/nyhaad

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